The Trouble with Self-Defense


Whether you carry a firearm or a knife, have outstanding empty-handed skills, or the best Shoe-Fu (running) in the world, the problem with any self-defense is in the title: defense. By its very nature, you are already behind as someone else has decided the when and where. You are now reacting to their rapid escalation of force.


Time isn’t on your side.


Consider the last time you trained your defensive skills. Assuming it was recently–if it wasn’t within the last two months, you don’t have skills, you have memories–think of the time you spent preparing to practice those moves.


  • Did you spend time organizing your gear?

  • Did you drive to a specific location to practice your skills?

  • Did you spend time performing dry fire or set move drills?

  • Did you make sure everything fit/worked perfectly?

  • Did you practice the skills you aren’t good at?

  • Did you let a friend punch you in the back of the head to signal it’s time to start? This one really tests a friendship…

  • Did you put yourself in the worst position imaginable before starting?

  • Did you imagine you were the antagonist? Outside of the military, there are very few instances when a civilian must perform a search and destroy action, but if they do, it’s likely in their home, and the stakes couldn’t be higher.

You can see how the first four bullet points are all preparatory. The next three aren’t the conditions most people put themselves in voluntarily. And I’m not discrediting whatever type of training you perform. Practice is essential to your self-defense skills and should be performed regularly and preferably under much pressure.


However, the moment we begin thinking about training, we have already taken the first few steps toward prepping our mind, body, and any equipment we might need. We are essentially making ourselves “ready.”


In the real world, your prep time will be minimal at best, at worst nonexistent. Time, mates, will either be your best friend or your worst enemy.

D.I.R.T. Dangerous Individual Recognition Training® maximizes the Reactionary Gap and gives you the gift of time and space. These two commodities will be in short supply and are essential to surviving a criminal act.


If you have time, you have space, which means you have more options to choose an appropriate response. Each fractional increase in the Reactionary Gap decreases the likelihood of severe injury or death–at least for you as the intended victim!


Don’t let someone else make time your enemy.


The next D.I.R.T. Dangerous Individual Recognition Training® workshop will be on Nov 19th, starting at 08.00 and ending at noon. Visit aimonpoint.com/dirt to sign up!

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